Energynet.CØN 2020

Online Engineering and Technology Conference

Conference broadcast
Plenary session
General information
Business programme
Speakers
For speakers
Registration
The EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre, with the support of the Russian Ministry of Energy and industry’s companies, is holding the first International Engineering and Technology Conference on Digital Transformation of the EnergyNet. CON Electric Power Industry.
The conference will be held in an online format from 16 to 20 November 2020 and will include technical sections, panel discussions and keynote sessions on implemented projects.

The conference events will be attended by representatives of energy companies: Rosatom, InterRAO, Rosseti, RusHydro, SO UES, Market Council, etc.

The conference will be structured around the following technical sessions:
— New Energy Sources and Flexibility
— Distributed Energy: Microgrid, Aggregators, Communities
— Hydrogen Energy and Industry Synergy
— New Market Design and New Services
— Digital Distribution Grids
— Cross-Cutting Technologies — Cyber Security
The Conference Programme provides detailed information.
Business Programme of the Energynet.CON International Engineering and Technology Conference
16 November
2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Plenary session
The transformation has already taken place. The main factors of change are the new interconnected reality, new technological paradigms, and new patterns of everyday human behaviour. Global mobility and global isolation have fused, all activity models are permeated by technology and are implemented by human-machine teams which create new business models, new regulatory models and new professional and functional behavioural models in new markets. The era of engineering hypercomplex social, biological, technical, cybernetical and physical systems has arrived. In this reality, the Engineer has already become the new heroes of the modern age. For the first time in 30 years, Engineers, by forming a union with information and technology, prove beyond any doubt that their role is more important and demanding than that of economists, lawyers, marketing specialists, managers and many other professionals. In our opinion, the combination of engineering competences and other professional skills is the most promising for successful corporate, industrial and overall national development.
As a part of our conference, we propose to take a well-considered step towards the formation of a community of electrical engineers who can transform electrical engineering in a non-destructive way, taking into consideration the interests of all parties involved. We invite you to join the movement.
Being an Engineer when the future is already here
Moderator
Oleg Grinko
Leader of the EnergyNet Working Group

New sources of energy and flexibility
Distributed power generation
Hydrogen power generation and industry synergy
New market design and new services
Digital electrical distribution grids
Cross-cutting technologies — cyber security
Energy storage systems (ESS) has already begun to be used in Russia and the first experience has been already gained both on the generation/grid side and the consumer side. The session will focus on identifying the key effects, problems and pitfalls of ESS integration into the power grid and their further operation by different types of entities.
Challenges and current experience in integrating and operating energy storage systems
Moderator
Reports
Boris Ablazov
Head of the Energy Department, LITECO Ltd
1. Conversion of operating DC voltage systems and transmission systems from lead to lithium. E. Askerov (Cathode Materials Ltd)
2. Ensuring the stable operation and increasing the efficiency of generator sets in the power grid with sharply varying loads by means of a power storage system. G. Nesterenko (ESS Ltd)
3. Application of ESS in remote/isolated areas. V. Vorozhev (ABIS ENERGO Ltd)
The "energy storage revolution" in the global electricity industry continues. According to RUSNANO, the global market for energy storage systems will reach approximately $80 billion in 2025. In Russia, with the assistance of EnergyNet, amendments to legislation governing the application of ESS in the energy markets are being prepared. Energy companies are implementing pilot projects to apply ESS. Do these trends mark the beginning of an "energy storage revolution" for Russia? Will widespread adoption of ESS lead to changes in the power industry structure in Russia?
When will there be an energy storage revolution in Russia?
The ESS market in Russia is on track and the large-scale application of energy storages is still ahead. This application depends to a large extent on whether new, improved technical solutions are available to meet the future requirements of market-significant consumers. These requirements and the possibilities of meeting them will be the subject of the session.
Projected requirements for energy storage systems
The growing demand for ESS in the Russian market does not necessarily mean that this market will be filled by the solutions of Russian manufacturers. The panellists will discuss the conditions under which domestic manufacturers can become successful in the home market and effectively compete with more experienced foreign companies.
When will Russian energy storage systems (ESS) become competitive on the market?
Boris Ablazov
Head of the Energy Department, LITECO Ltd
This block will present projects on the application of energy storage systems in the energy industry and technologies for their use.
17 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
17 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Emin Askerov
General Director of Cathode Materials LLC
18 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Moderator
Reports
Boris Ablazov
Head of the Energy Department, LITECO Ltd
1. The role of power grid energy storages in the distribution power grid complex. V. Kononenko (ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC))
2. Piloting a large project in parts. P. Kropotin (Energozapas Ltd)
3. Projected requirements in the transition to the widespread use of electric vehicles. I. Shkabara (Agency for Strategic Initiatives ANO)
4. Optimal management of energy storage systems. P. Vorobyov (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology)
5. Prospects for stationary hybrid energy storage systems. A. Usenko (InEnergy Ltd)
6. Creating a prototype of a cryogenic energy storage device and analysing the performance of industrial cryogenic energy storage devices. A. Markelov (Ecoprotech STC Ltd)
7. Prospects for the development of post-lithium electrochemical current sources. A. Abakumov (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology)
18 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
19 November
2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Project presentation
Moderator
Boris Ablazov
Head of the Energy Department, LITECO Ltd
Проекты
1. Solid-state storage power plant. P. Kropotin (Energozapas Ltd)
2. Use of electricity storage devices to optimise the cost of supplying electric power to industrial consumers. A. Neshta (Atomenergopromsbyt JSC)
3. A fast-charging system for electric vehicles with a capacity of over 20 kW. S. Shumilin (Milandr ICC JSC)
4. Production of energy storage devices in Novosibirsk. B. Ablazov (LITECO Ltd )
5. Application of ESS in distribution networks of IDGC of Centre. D. Rybnikov (IDGC of Centre PJSC)
On 24 September 2020, Resolution No. 320 of the Russian Government came into force, launching a pilot project to create microgrids in Russia for commercial and industrial consumers — active energy complexes (AECs). Demand for distributed power generation solutions is receiving an additional driver. Globally, there has been a steady increase in demand for microgrids for industrial and commercial sectors.
There is a particular demand for engineering solutions that enable the rapid integration of microgrids, their optimal management and the formation of energy communities of generators and consumers in the AEC, local electricity markets and energy flexibility for them. Technological solutions to these problems will be the subject of reports at the session.
Active energy complexes and energy communities
Moderator
Reports
Igor Chausov
Head of Analytical Division of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
1. Active energy complexes: organisational and technological aspects. K. Datsko (Scientific and Technical Centre of Unified Power System JSC), N. Zaitsev (Scientific and Technical Centre of Unified Power System JSC)
2. Minigrid is a self-balancing local energy system for the energy community. A. Fishov (FSBEI HE NSTU)
3. Optimal energy source management and flexibility in the active energy complexes. N. Shubin (RTSoft JSC)
4. The digital twin of the technocenosis with respect to electricity consumption. V. Gnatyuk (FSBEI HE KSTU)
5. BlaBlaWatt — power generation for the Day of Judgment. M. Pavlichenko (FSBEI HE USURT)
Managed Intelligent Connectivity (MIC) is a key and mandatory element in the architecture of active energy complexes (AECs) — microgrids for commercial and industrial consumers in Russia. The MIC is a hardware and software system that supports the parameters of power flow from the UES to the AEC within the permitted capacity of the AEC, as well as equalises the production and consumption of energy in the AEC and enables limiting the consumption of electricity by consumers within the AEC. The requirements for MIC are provided in Order No. 507 of the Russian Ministry of Energy dated 30 June 2020.
The subject of the panel discussion will be approaches and opportunities for the implementation of MIC based on modern digital energy technologies, including platform, transactional, multi-agency technologies and power conversion equipment.
Managed intelligent connectivity: how to make it?
Energy flexibility is a new and trendy concept in the energy industry, which can be defined as the ability of power plants to purposefully influence the power and capacity balance in the power grid. The creation of flexibility markets is being discussed around the world, mainly in the development of system services markets, as well as the use of energy storage (ESS) and demand management systems.
In Russia, the practice of managing consumer demand in the retail market has been actively developing since 2019 as part of a pilot project; a target model of the relevant market is under preparation, and the possibility of widespread application of ESSs connected to power grids will open up in the near future. The Russian market needs technological solutions to make practices related to energy flexibility as mass and effective as possible, to integrate small distributed consumers and potential owners of ESSs, including electric vehicles, through the intellectualisation of management and digital technologies. The engineering capabilities to solve these problems will be the subject of reports at the session.
Internet of Energy: management of distributed sources of energy and flexibility
On the last day of the section's work, implemented projects in the field of the new distributed energy architecture (Internet of Energy), distributed controlled isolated microgrids, decentralised commercial consumer load management systems and other projects in the field of distributed power generation will be presented.
17 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
17 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Igor Chausov
Head of Analytical Division of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
18 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Moderator
Reports
Kirill Ermolaev
PhD in economics, Head of Division, EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
1. Architecture of the Internet of Energy and its practical implementation. I. Chausov (EnergyNet IC, North-West CSR)
2. Distributed management of energy flexibility in isolated power grids. I. Ozyornykh (FSAEI HE MIPT Research and Technology Centre for Autonomous Energy)
3. Ensuring energy transactions between distributed energy facilities. A. Voloshin (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
4. New principles of frequency shaping control. P. Vorobyov (Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology)
5. Sliding modes in the management of electricity flows. Yu. Skuryatin (FSBEI HE BSTU)
19 November
2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Project presentation
Moderator
Igor Chausov
Head of Analytical Division of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
The need to integrate distributed sources of energy and energy flexibility — managed load and energy storages — increases as these energy solutions become cheaper. This opens up a fundamental opportunity to create the Internet of Energy — a system for the free exchange of energy and energy services between participants in distributed power generation. But how technologically prepared are we today for such an energy exchange? Do we understand all the underlying potential problems of the technical implementation of energy transactions between distributed sources of energy and consumers, peer-to-peer markets, the use of consumers' energy storages and power generation technologies? The panel discussion will focus on assessing the technological availability to implement the idea of the Internet of Energy and identify the most important unresolved problems and challenges that separate us from the construction of the Internet of Energy.
Internet of Energy: implementable today or far future? Discussion on technological availability
Igor Chausov
Head of Analytical Division of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
18 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Panellists
Scientific and Technical Centre of Unified Power System Group, System Operator of United Power System JSC, Rosseti PJSC, NP Market Council Association, Association of the Electricity Consumer Community, EnergyNet IC, MPEI NTI, NSTU, RTSoft JSC, EnergoRazvitie Engineering Centre, Eliot Ltd
Projects
1. Internet of Energy demonstration complex. I. Burdin (EnergyNet IC, North-West CSR)
2. The autonomous hybrid power system in the village of Laborovaya with diesel power generation based on variable frequency diesel engines and heat energy storages. Yu. Vasilyev (FSAEI HE MIPT Research and Technology Centre for Autonomous Energy)
Discussants: FSAEI HE MIPT Research and Technology Centre for Autonomous Energy, EnergyNet IC, FSBEI HE MPEI NTI, FSBEI HE NSTU, RTSoft JSC, Eliot Ltd, Scientific and Technical Centre of Unified Power System Group
Panellists
New technologies for the generation, transmission, distribution and conversion of electric power, as well as for the management of electrical installations and modes are constantly emerging and developing in the world's power grids.
Business processes and market mechanisms must not only keep up with new technologies but also work in a feedback mode, creating a demand for new technological solutions. This relationship will be the focus of the session.
Technological transformation of markets in the electric power industry
Moderator
Reports
Oleg Barkin
Deputy Chairman of the Board of NP Market Council Association
1. Integrated optimisation of day-ahead market applications to improve ESS and HPP application efficiency. T. Vaskovskaya (Trade System Administrator JSC)
2. Differentiated calculation of regimes and prices on electricity markets. V. Makeechev (independent expert)
3. Energy-cost distribution model and its application in power grids. A. Egorov (FSAEI HE B.N. Yeltsin Ural Federal University)
4. Peer-to-peer electricity market in a microgrid. A. Voloshin (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
5. Potential for the application of storage systems on electricity markets. V. Berezovsky, S. Gafarov (NP Market Council Association)
6. Economic prerequisites for the operation of distributed power generation. Proactive management of distributed power generation. Current conditions and promising market changes. D. Senchuk (NP Market Council Association)
The power industry is developing in the areas of decentralisation, decarbonisation and digitalisation, supported by the development of distributed generation technologies that reduce the dependence of market stakeholders on the power grid, power generation technologies based on low-carbon and renewable energy sources, information technologies that increase the observability of technological processes and transparency of energy transactions.
The panel experts will try to identify how energy markets are transforming under the influence of new technologies.
3D trends in the electric power industry. Which trend will shape the structure of future energy markets?
The global technological transformation not only transforms traditional power generation, transmission and distribution services and turns the consumer into an active participant in these processes, but also creates new tools, goods and services, including through the active implementation of IT technologies.
Introduction of new environmental digital assets arising from the low-carbon and renewable energy sources power generation. Increasing the efficiency of production and consumption by small market players through cooperation and coordination of activities, their involvement in the management of the energy system based on information and communication technologies. The session will focus on these and other new instruments, goods and services on energy markets.
New tools and digital services on energy markets
Blockchain technology is one of the most promising ways to increase the transparency of data and digital asset exchange processes between consumers and suppliers of energy goods and services. Is it possible to use blockchain technology to reduce transaction costs and create added value in existing and new goods and services in the power industry?
Blockchain in the power industry: the new quality or a tribute to fashion?
Mikhail Andronov
President of RUSENERGOSBYT Ltd
This block will include presentations of pilot projects using information technology, including blockchains, to ensure automated interaction between market participants and infrastructure organisations in terms of fiscal metering data exchange, circulation of new goods (using the example of green certificates) and services (using the example of organising interaction between demand aggregators and aggregation facilities and monitoring distribution networks).
17 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
17 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Oleg Barkin
Deputy Chairman of the Board of NP Market Council Association
18 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Moderator
Reports
Sergey Anfimov
Head of Audit and Technological Expertise Department of NP Market Council Association
1. Certificates of origin for electricity: history, modern age, perspective. A. Belokrys (NP Market Council Association)
2. The practice of using certificates of origin for electricity following the example of the International REC Standard system. T. Lanshina (Goal Number Seven Association)
3. Origin of electricity and the carbon footprint of Russian products. A. Spirin (EN+ GROUP IC PJSC)
4. Blockchain as a digital energy tool by the example of the system for the circulation of electricity origin certificates S. Anfimov (NP Market Council Association)
5. Advantages of using block-chains in systems for the circulation of electricity origin certificates and for the organisation of interaction between demand aggregators and consumers. R. Gabitov (Eliot Ltd (Onder))
6. Digital service for predicting the feeder's power consumption through in-depth neural network training methods. S. Petrova
7. The practice of applying the blockchain in the European power industry. Representative of EDF, France (pending approval)
18 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
19 November
2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Project presentation
Moderator
Sergey Anfimov
Head of Audit and Technological Expertise Department of NP Market Council Association
Projects
1. Interface of a prototype system for recording the circulation of electricity origin certificates and a system for organising interaction between demand aggregators and consumers. R. Gabitov (Eliot Ltd (Onder))
2. A decentralised system of interaction between electricity retail market participants based on the Waves Enterprise blockchain platform. Representative of Waves Enterprise
3. Implementation of low-voltage network monitoring through a service-oriented approach. K. Netreba (Aidis Technologies Ltd)
The open ontology-based development of a digital network model is the basis of digital transformation. Today, the power grid and its facilities de facto exist in the form of a set of separate, usually conflicting, paper or conventionally electronic documents supported within the individual organisation and service business processes. Under current conditions, it is impossible to make optimal decisions without a single grid model. In the first session, we will look at the practical experience in developing mathematical models of individual elements, possible applications of 'big data' technology, general approaches to the formation of physical modelling parameters, external critical factors and practical applications and talk about CIM standards as one of the methods of description.
Simulation modelling (digital twins) in distribution grids
Moderator
Reports
Vladislav Vorotnitsky
Leader of the Reliable and Flexible Networks segment, EnergyNet NTI Working Group
1. Introductory speech. V. Vorotnitsky (EnergyNet NTI Working Group)
2. Application of CIM to solve the problems of the power grid complex. V. Chaikin (ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC))
3. Possibilities of applying digital twins to digital substations (vision). V. Matison (EKRA R&D Company)
4. Reliability calculations based on a simulation of the accident response process. D. Belosheikin (Smart Power Grids Ltd)
5. System of electrical power transmission management using BigData. O. Turkina (ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC))
In the process of solving any engineering or scientific problem, it is crucial to define the target function and set of limitations, then correctly formulate hypotheses and identify possible obstacles. We will talk about directions for research in digital grids at the panel discussion.
Setting goals for the transition to digital grids, technological obstacles along the way
The concept of digital substations in Russia has existed for over 5 years. Many pilot projects and research and development activities have been carried out. Discussions about the economic effects of using digital substations compared to traditional solutions, the most optimal architectures in terms of both secondary and primary equipment, are still ongoing. We will talk about the results of the first major R&D work, first conclusions and differences on the second day.
Digital substations — first practical results
The main common point in the Digital Substation community is that the introduction of this technology will fundamentally change existing design practices. At the panel, we will discuss the changes, the practical experience of design and software platforms.
The design paradigm shift as a key milestone in the transition to digital substations
Vyacheslav Chaikin
Head of Digital Technologies and IT Solutions Department, ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC)
In this block, we are planning to demonstrate examples of projects in three areas: Digital PDA, Digital Substation, Big Data for Power Transmission Management. Presentations will be held interactively with a demonstration of actually functioning systems and facilities.
17 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
17 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Vyacheslav Chaikin
Head of Digital Technologies and IT Solutions Department, ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC)
18 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Moderator
Reports
Vyacheslav Chaikin
Head of Digital Technologies and IT Solutions Department, ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC)
1. Review of the current status of the establishment of digital substations in Rosseti and FGC UES and the implementation of research and development in this area. G. Gladkovsky (ROSSETI PJSC)
2. Designing digital substations according to IEC61850 from theory to practice. V. Chaikin (FTC JSC)
3. Application of open ontologies for design and operation of digital substations. A. Voloshin (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
4. Life cycle support system for design, acceptance and operation of digital substations. A. Shemetov (FGC UES PJSC), A. Anoshin (Tekvel Development Ltd)
18 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
19 November
2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Project presentation
Moderator
Vladislav Vorotnitsky
Leader of the Reliable and Flexible Networks segment, EnergyNet NTI Working Group
Panellists
Rosseti PJSC, FSBEI HE MPEI NTI, EKRA R&D Company, Tavrida Electric JSC, EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
Rosseti PJSC, Tekvel Development Ltd, EKRA R&D company, RELEMATICA Ltd, Radius Automatic JSC, Vector Ltd
Panellist
Projects
1. Grid energy storage device. IDGC of Centre PJSC
2. Big data for transmission management. Rosseti Lenenergo PJSC
3. Digital PDA, PLUG & PLAY ENGINEERING Ltd
4. Salut 110 kV DSS IDGC of Centre PJSC
In a recent report, the Hydrogen Council experts say that by 2050 hydrogen will account for 18% of the world's energy needs. Other forecasts are that global hydrogen consumption will grow to 370 million tonnes per annum by this time (to 800 million tonnes by 2100).
At the first session, leading experts in their fields will talk about the status of developments in the production, transportation and use of green, blue and yellow hydrogen in the world and in Russia. You will find out whether hydrogen can be obtained from hydrocarbons not only without emitting CO2 but also without its burial. Are there Russian electrolysis and fuel cell technologies that require cooperation with the West?
New technologies in the hydrogen economy
Moderator
Reports
Yury Dobrovolsky
Head of the NTI Competence Centre in the field of Technologies for Creating New and Portable Energy Sources, RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics
1. Methods for the production of green hydrogen: new opportunities. A. Maksimov (RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics)
2. Modern technologies in electrolysis. V. Kuleshov (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
3. Fuel elements in energy and transportation. Yu. Dobrovolsky (RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics)
4. Hydrogen economy in the world. A. Kashin (SC InEnergy JSC)
With the introduction of the carbon tax, the cost structure of many fuels may change permanently, especially when exported. At the panel session, customers, manufacturers, developers and consumers will try to forecast which ways of obtaining and transporting hydrogen and other energy sources will be most in demand.
Hydrogen in a zero-carbon economy
Which hydrogen energy technologies are in demand today and which are needed in the near future? At the second session, Russian and foreign customers will answer these questions and also carry out a detailed review of hydrogen energy road maps in Russia and Germany.
New technologies in the hydrogen economy
Will Russia remain the only state exporting energy abroad? Where and how can hydrogen technology succeed in Russia and abroad? Is the era of hydrogen vehicles ahead of us and does Russia have its own potential in the hydrogen race?
Hydrogen energy development scenarios: in Russia — is it possible to use hydrogen energy without domestic hydrogen consumption?
Igor Landgraf
Chief Designer, Krylov State Research Centre
Yury Dobrovolsky
Head of the NTI Competence Centre in the field of Technologies for creating new and portable energy sources, RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics
At the end of the technical section, leading universities and centres will present their test sites and new hydrogen projects.
17 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
17 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Yury Konev
Head of the project office Hydrogen Energy of VNIIAES JSC
Anton Maksimov
Director of Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, RAS
18 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Moderator
Speakers
Yury Dobrovolsky
Head of the NTI Competence Centre in the field of Technologies for Creating New and Portable Energy Sources, RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics
Aleksei Kulapin — General Director of FSBU REA
Aleksandr Ishkov — Deputy Head of Department — Head of Division of Gazprom PJSC
Anton Moskvin — Vice President for Marketing and Business Development of Rusatom Overseas JSC
Kilian Crone — Team leader, International cooperation hydrogen and powerfuels
18 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
19 November
2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Project presentation
Moderator
Anton Moskvin
Vice President for Marketing and Business Development, Rusatom Overseas JSC
Projects
1. Site of FSAEI HE National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University. A. Yakovlev
2. Site of FSBEI HE Samara State Technical University. A. Pimenov
3. Site of FRC Krylov State Research Centre. I. Landgraf
4. Distributed Infrastructure Centre of Hydrogen Technologies. A. Golodnitsky (InEnergy Ltd), Yu. Dobrovolsky (RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics)
The digitalisation of the power industry and the introduction of modern technologies require a review of the role of information security and approach to it. The session will include reports that will introduce us to current realities and international practice, as well as allow considering possible ways to effectively develop information security (IS) in the energy sector of the future.
Topical issues of information security
Moderator
Reports
Aleksandr Karpenko
Head of Protection of APCS and CII, Jet Infosystems JSC
1. Main problems in the field of ensuring information security through the Ministry of Energy: advanced technologies, industrial IoT, autonomous territories. E. Novikov (Ministry of Energy of Russia)
2. International regulatory framework and decisions of international committees in the area of energy cybersecurity. A. Gurevich (IC Sibintek Ltd)
3. Staffing support for the IS process control systems. Development of an educational and professional standard for a specialist in the field of IS process control systems in the fuel and energy sector. M. Smirnov (InfoWatch JSC)
4. Open ontology of electricity cybersecurity. D. Pravikov (Research and Academic Centre for New Information and Analytical Technologies, FSAEI HE Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas)
5. An industry cyber-attacks monitoring and response centre in the power industry. L. Palei (System Operator of United Power System JSC), A. Chugunov (Inter RAO PJSC)
Ensuring cybersecurity requires joint work by all participants in the energy sector: suppliers of automation equipment and systems, enterprises, universities, government agencies, developers and integrators of information security solutions. The panel is proposed to discuss opportunities to build effective joint work for such a wide audience of participants.
Organisation of constructive cooperation between specialists from different business areas
The session will consider practical examples of ensuring the information security of energy systems (microgrid, electric power metering system, power substations).
Practical IS solutions and technologies
The digitalisation and introduction of advanced technologies require a different view of data and its role in the life of enterprises. At the same time, the role of all adjacent areas also needs to be reviewed. Existing information security practices may provide something new to these global processes. The challenges and opportunities of digitalisation in terms of information security will be addressed at a panel discussion.
Information security: possible benefits for the digital power industry
Aleksei Petukhov
Head of Industrial CyberSecurity, Kaspersky Laboratory JSC
17 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
17 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator
Aleksandr Karpenko
Head of Protection of APCS and CII, Jet Infosystems JSC
18 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Moderator
Reports
Aleksei Petukhov
Head of Industrial CyberSecurity, Kaspersky Laboratory JSC
1. Experience in providing IS for autonomous microgrid systems (by the example of Laborovaya project). M. Nikandrov (Intelligent Grids Ltd)
2. An example of an IS expert system based on the ontological model. V. Karantaev (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
3. Information protection in the intelligent electric power metering system. I. Kostromin (MILANDR ICC JSC)
4. Application of AI methods for optimal synthesis of design solutions using the example of power substation control systems. N. Grachyova (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
18 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Moderator

The block of practices for creating educational programmes in the areas of EnergyNet:
- Moscow Energy Institute (Technical University)
- Higher School of Economics
- Novosibirsk State Technical University
Staff training practices in the digital power industry
Irina Volkova
Deputy Director of the Institute for the Economics and Regulation of Infrastructure Industries, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Prospects for creating an all-Russian network training programme for the digital power industry.
"People make all the difference" — this thesis has been relevant over the years, and, rather, it becomes even more prominent in times of technological transformation. It is obvious that today only a limited number of universities in our country are ready to train personnel for the future power industry. A bold idea emerged in the depths of EnergyNet — to create a web-based form of training for students and teachers on the principles of University 20.35. Will it be possible to reach an agreement? Let's try it!
Oleg Grinko
Leader of the Energy Working Group

Aleksandr Voloshin
Head of the Department of Relay Protection and Automation of Power Systems of FSBEI HE MPEI NTI.

Vladislav Vorotnitsky
Leader of the Reliable and Flexible Networks segment, EnergyNet Technology Working Group

Svetlana Petrova
Head of the Basic Department of Intelligent Power Grids
20 November
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Plenary session
Moderator
Engineers of the Digital Energy age
20 November
3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Panel discussion
Irina Volkova
Deputy Director of the Institute for the Economics and Regulation of Infrastructure Industries, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Moderator
Participants
1. A new Master's degree programme for the staffing of the digital power industry. A. Voloshin (FSBEI HE MPEI NTI)
2. Scientific and Educational Centre for Digital Technologies in the Power Industry. Yu. Kazantsev (FSBEI HE NSTU)
3. Smart Power Supply Grids (EnergyNet) Master's degree network programme. S. Petrova
4. A draft industry platform for digital skills development based on the Digital Energy Association. A. Korneeva (Inter RAO PJSC)
Reports
Plenary session speakers and moderators
Oleg Grinko
Leader of the EnergyNet Working Group
Director of Young Professionals Division of the Agency for Strategic Initiatives
Dmitry Peskov
First Deputy Chairman of the Committee on Energy, the State Duma of the Russian Federation
Valery Seleznyov
Deputy General Director for Digital Transformation, Rosseti PJSC
Konstantin Mikhailik
Director of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
Dmitry Kholkin
Deputy Chairman of the Board of NP Market Council Association
Oleg Barkin
Leader of the Reliable and Flexible Networks segment, EnergyNet NTI Working Group
Vladislav Vorotnitsky
Pavel Sorokin
Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Ministry of Energy of Russia
Deputy Chairman of the Management Board, System Operator of United Power System JSC
Fyodor Opadchy
Head of Analytical Division of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre
Igor Chausov
Head of the NTI Competence Centre in the field of Technologies for creating new and portable energy sources, RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics
Deputy Director of the Institute for the Economics and Regulation of Infrastructure Industries, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Irina Volkova
Head of the Department of Relay Protection and Automation of Power Systems, FSBEI HE MPEI NTI
Aleksandr Voloshin
Vice President for Marketing and Business Development, Rusatom Overseas JSC
Anton Moskvin
Executive Director of the Scientific and Technical Centre of Autonomous Energy, FSAEI HE MIPT Research and Technology Centre for Autonomous Energy
Yury Vasilyev
Head of Digital Transformation Promotion Department, Inter RAO PJSC
Anzhelika Korneeva
Head of Digital Technologies and IT Solutions Department, ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC)
Vyacheslav Chaikin
Head of Audit and Technological Expertise Department of NP Market Council Association
Sergei Anfimov
Speakers of technical sections
Aleksei Anoshin — General Director, Tekvel Development Ltd
Aleksei Belokrys — Project Manager, Department of New Technology Expertise, NP Market Council Association
Kilian Crone — Team leader, International cooperation hydrogen and powerfuels
Daniil Belosheikin — Smart Power Grids Ltd
Vladislav Berezovsky — Expert of the Department of New Technology Expertise, NP Market Council Association
Ilya Burdin — Leading expert of EnergyNet Infrastructure Centre, EnergyNet IC, North-West CSR
Tatyana Vaskovskaya — Head of the Analytical Systems Development Department, ATS JSC
Pyotr Vorobyov — Deputy Director of the Energy Technology Centre, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology
Vasily Vorozhev — General Director, ABIS-ENERGO Ltd.
Rustam Gabitov — Deputy General Director, Eliot Ltd (Onder)
Sergei Gafarov — Project Manager of the Legal Management Project, NP Market Council Association
Grigory Gladkovsky — Deputy Director of the Technical Policy Department, Rosseti PJSC
Viktor Gnatyuk — Professor, FSBEI HE KSTU
Andrei Golodnitsky — Deputy General Director — Chief Designer, InEnergy Ltd
Natalya Grachyova — FSBEI HE MPEI NTI
Aleksei Gurevich — Deputy Head of Department, IC SIBINTEK Ltd
Kseniya Datsko — General Director, Scientific and Technical Centre of Unified Power System JSC
Aleksandr Egorov — Associate Professor, Department of Automated Electrical Systems, Ural Power Engineering Institute, FSAEI HE Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin
Nikolai Zaitsev — AEC Project Manager, Head of Department, Scientific and Technical Centre of Unified Power System JSC
Aleksandr Ishkov — Deputy Head of Department — Head of Division of Gazprom PJSC
Vladimir Karantaev — Expert of the Competence Centre, EnergyNet NTI Energy, FSBEI HE MPEI NTI
Aleksei Kashin — Chairman of the Board of Directors, InEnergy Group of Companies
Vladimir Kononenko — Academic advisor, FTC JSC
Igor Kostromin — Head of Embedded Trust Systems Department, Milandr ICC JSC
Pyotr Kropotin — Deputy General Director, Energozapas Ltd
Aleksei Kulapin — General Director, FSBI Russian Energy Agency
Vladimir Kuleshov — Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Electrochemical Energy, FSBEI HE MPEI NTI
Tatyana Lanshina — General Director and co-founder of the Goal Number Seven Association
Vasily Makeechev — Independent expert
Aleksei Markelov — Chief Process Engineer, Limited Liability Company Ecopromtech Science and Technology Centre and Experimental Design Bureau of Precision Mechanics Ltd
Vladimir Matison — Deputy Technical Director for Digitalisation of Electric Power Industry, EKRA R&D Company
Gleb Nesterenko — Engineer, Energy Storage Systems Ltd
Kirill Netreba — General Director, Aidis Technologies Ltd
Aleksei Neshta — Director of the project office, Atomenergopromsbyt JSC
Maksim Nikandrov — Director of Intelligent Grids Ltd
Evgeny Novikov — Head of the Information Security Department, Russian Ministry of Energy
Igor Ozyornykh — Chief Designer, FSAEI HE MIPT Research and Technology Centre for Autonomous Energy
Svetlana Petrova — Head of the Basic Department of Intelligent Energy Supply Networks
Lev Palei — Head of Department of the Information Security Service, System Operator of United Power System JSC
Andrei Pimenov — Vice-Rector of FSAEI HE SamSTU
Dmitry Pravikov — Director of Research and Academic Centre for New Information and Analytical Technologies, FSAEI HE Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas
Mikhail Pavlichenko — Senior lector at FSBEI HE USURT, Director of DDK Ltd
Dmitry Rybnikov — Acting Head of the Directorate for Innovation and Import Substitution, IDGC of Centre PJSC
Dmitry Senchuk — Senior Expert of the Department of New Technology Expertise, NP Market Council Association
Yury Skuryatin — Assistant professor, Institute of Energy, FSBEI HE BSTU
Mikhail Smirnov — Director of the Expert and Analytical Centre, InfoWatch JSC
Aleksei Spirin — Director of the Department for Environmental and Climate Risk Management, EN+ GROUP IC PJSC
Olga Turkina — Deputy General Director for Technical Policy, ROSSETI Scientific and Technical Centre (FTC JSC)
Andrei Usenko — Head of Energy Solutions, InEnergy Ltd
Aleksandr Fishov — Professor, FSBEI HE NSTU
Andrei Shemetov — Deputy Head of the Relay Protection, Metrology and Automatic Process Control Department, FGC UES PJSC
Ilya Shkabara — Expert in the field of Entrepreneurship and Technology, Agency for Strategic Initiatives ANO
Nikolai Shubin — Chief Expert, RTSoft JSC
Sergei Shumilin — Deputy Director General for Science, Milandr ICC JSC
Aleksei Chugunov — Head of the Information Security Department, Inter RAO PJSC
Andrei Yakovlev — Acting Rector of FSAEI HE National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University
Representative of EDF, France
Representative of Waves Enterprise
President of RUSENERGOSBYT Ltd
Mikhail Andronov
General Director of Cathode Materials Ltd
Emin Askerov
Head of the Laboratory Automation of Power Systems, FSBEI HE NSTU
Yury Kazantsev
Head of Industrial CyberSecurity, Kaspersky Laboratory
Aleksei Petukhov
Director of RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics
Anton Maksimov
Chief Designer, Central Research Ship Electric Engineering & Technology Institute, branch of FSUE Krylov State Research Centre
Igor Landgraf
Head of Protection of APCS and CII, Jet Infosystems JSC
Aleksandr Karpenko
Yury Dobrovolsky
Head of Division, EnergyNet IC, North-West CSR
Kirill Ermolaev
Authors whose reports are included in the main programme of Energynet. CON should submit demonstration materials electronically to the Technical Committee of the Conference (by e-mail to info@internetofenergy.ru).

Authors who wish to draw special attention to their report may submit an abstract (thesis) of the report to the Technical Committee. Abstracts will be posted on the Conference Programme page, with a link to the relevant report.

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Requirements for documents are set out below:
 — Requirements for abstracts (thesis). The deadline for submission is 6 November 2020 at the latest.
 — Requirements for demonstration materials. The deadline for submission is 11 November 2020 at the latest.
 — Requirements for reports (articles). The deadline for submission is 20 November 2020 at the latest.
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Information Partners

Sponsors

Nesterenko G.B. (LLC «Energy Storage Systems»)

Generators stability and efficiency enhancement in power system with abruptly variable load by use of electrical energy storage system

Background. In off-grid power systems of oil-and-gas fields, abruptly variable power consumption often leads to the frequency and voltage fluctuations, increased fuel consumption and decreased generators running life. Load dumps and surges could cause the shutdown of generators which are sensitive to abrupt power changes. This problem is typical to gas engine generators. Therefore, usually a greater number of generators than the maximum load value requires is used to decrease a relative value of load change. Extra generators result in additional costs. Accordingly, the developing of the solution without these disadvantages is a topical issue.

Materials and methods. The proposed research offers the application of electrical energy storage system (EESS) ensuring smooth change of generators power. The research includes the following procedures: the analysis of measurements in the oil field power system, the determination of the optimal power system configuration based on gas engine generators and EESS, the development of EESS control algorithm, choosing EESS parameters, development, manufacturing and field testing of 1200 kVA 400 kWh EESS. The EESS has been tested in the off-grid power system which included the gas engine power plant with a power of 2250 kW.

Results. The EESS control algorithm ensuring steady change of generators power has been developed. The EESS parameters have been selected for the oil field power system. The simulation results have shown that the application of EESS makes it possible to reduce the number of generators required for sustainable operation of the power system with two drill rigs from 6 to 3. The results of the 1200 kVA 400 kWh EESS test in the off-grid power system have shown that the EESS successfully ensures sustainable and fault-free operation of generators.

Conclusions. The simulation results and field tests are evidence in favor of the appropriateness of the EESS application for providing smooth power change for generators operating in power system with abruptly variable load. The EESS ensures generators stability and enhances their efficiency. This reduces specific fuel consumption and increases generators running life due to increased installed capacity utilization factor and optimal mode for generators operation.
Markelov A.Yu. (LLC "STC "Ecopromtech")

Prototyping cryogenic energy storage (CES) and technical and economic indices analysis for industrial CES

Cryogenic energy storage (CES) are developed for peak generation, hybrid power plants and renewable energy sources (RES). CES are based on the use of reliable power equipment, mastered by industry, including domestic production. Therefore, the main CES advantages include: long cycling resource (> 10,000 cycles), long service life (at least 30 years), low degradation rate. Due to the high density of stored energy, CES have such properties as compactness, the ability to be placed where needed. The above factors make it possible to scale CES to the needs of large-scale power generation (>100 MW/1 GWh).

The difference between CES, developed by the project team, from foreign analogues in the use of a wider range of liquefaction and generation cycles, allowing you to choose the optimal technical solution depending on the purpose of using the energy storage device. Creation and testing product engineering sample (prototype) stage and CES engineering and construction design procedures verification has been completed. A number of business cases have been formulated based on developed CES computer model.

CES for exhaust gas heat recovery from peak or stationary gas turbine units (GTU) is a hybrid power plant. It is a new product in the power control and demand management equipment market. CES for GTU solves the problem of reducing emissions when burning traditional fuels, since it allows 1.5 times to increase the generated power of a gas turbine without using additional fuel. Such systems round-trip efficiency is 70-90%. CES with compression thermal energy storage (or third-party renewable heat source) has zero emissions, refers to RES, solves the problem of increasing the share of "green" generating facilities in the energy system, the efficiency can reach 70%.CES with indirect heating by the calorific value of the fuel can generate about 8.5 kW per 1 m3/h of natural gas and has round-trip efficiency about 130%.

Technical and economic assessments of industrial systems have been carried out. The most cost-effective scenarios for their use have been identified, taking into account potential sources of payback: additional revenue from the difference between the day and night tariffs, a capacity sale agreement for RES, competitive power take-off.

Further implementation of the project will allow to bring new products to equipment market for peak generation and demand management, which reduce emissions when using traditional fuels or are RES.

Petrova S.Yu.

Digital service for predicting the power consumption of a feeder using deep learning methods of a neural network

The purpose of creating a service: to simulate a time series of power consumption on a network segment to be able to predict future values of the series based on current and past estimates using a recurrent neural network LSTM (Long Short-Term Memory).

It is assumed that the sensor data presented in the form of a time series describing the evolution of the feeder energy consumption cannot be approximated by a simple analytical expression and do not have a periodicity. Such a time series can be viewed as a stochastic process that can only be described in terms of a probability distribution.

Any continuously evaluated signal can be expressed as a directly time-varying function of the signal itself, other signals, environment, and noise.

The function describing the signal is likely to be extremely complex and non-linear. Environment variables can be unknown and not measurable. For this reason, it is more efficient to determine the invariant properties of the signal, and on this basis to make predictions.

In order to understand what is present in the signal data, we must apply several filters to them and highlight trends. Then remove the trends from the data and bring the signal to a stationary form. As a result, there is noise that we feed to train the LSTM neural network model. In this approach, to predict the future values of the series, we can use the previous values of the series and describe this process as autoregression. That is, at each time step of the input sequence, the LSTM network learns to predict the value of the next time step. To the obtained forecast, we add trends and, as a result, we get a forecast of the energy consumption of a particular feeder. We examine the signal in both forward and backward directions. And let's explore the dependencies between the elements. And both of these dependencies, both in the forward and in the opposite direction, give a good result. The network is trained using the backpropagation method. Error propagation begins from the very last layer in which the function that counts the error is protected. The element that got around the problem of fading and bursting gradients is a connection that stretches through the entire network and has no nonlinearity (since only addition and multiplication operations are used).

Petrova S.Yu.

Network Master's Program "Intelligent Power Grids" (Energynet)

It is evidently that the training of personnel with an understanding Digital District Power Sstation concept will allow the successful development of the digital distributed electric power market.

The network educational program "Intelligent Power Grids" was developed taking into influence the level and characteristics of the resource provision of organizations participating in the program.

The main idea of the program is to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize project-based learning and research work into a concrete practical result (final qualifying work, patent, employment).

To implement the idea, students must participate in the project activities of an industrial partner and expand the options for educational track.

The first condition is implemented in the following way: the industrial partner has a list of topical areas and projects within which a master's student can conduct his scientific research. It is also possible to perform individual tasks for real production projects, accumulating practical experience.

The specialization and student’s set of competencies are based on the tasks of research and development. To expand the possibilities of training, the student is given the right to independently select the module (discipline) he or she needs, compensating for the lack of competence. Modules can be implemented on the basis of virtual academic mobility (interuniversity course catalogs in online format) or as continuing education courses. The basis for the offset of the results and inclusion in the individual plan, in this case, may be a certificate or certificate that the student receives at the end of the course. This allows diversifying the educational program and implementing it at the junction of various areas of professional activity.

This is a master's program that links the formal education model, new educational technologies and an industrial partner. Such interaction activates fundamental developments, develops into joint research and the implementation of their results into real production. Participation in this process of students forms in them the qualities necessary for innovative activity, as well as professional activity at the junction of various areas of science and technology.

Kostromin Igor (JSC ICC Milandr)

Implementation of the cryptographic security in smart power meters

National program “Digital Economy” was adopted by authorities of Russia at late 2010s. Within this program new concept of the power delivery was introduced. It will dramatically change smart power meters market of Russia.

Main features of this concept is transferring control of the meters from citizens to supply companies, provide information security and increase rate of Russian electronic components within meters to 90%.

There was prepared some legal documents to support this concept: national standard of the interchange protocol with smart power meters (GOST R 58940-2020), guidelines how to implement domestic cryptography within this standard (MR 26.4.003-2019) and requirements to hardware that should be used for that purposes.

In Russia companies should have resolution from Federal Security Service to implement cryptographic features within their products. Most of smart meters manufactures has no such resolution and will be forced to use embedded security modules.

In 2020 new smart meter integrated circuit (IC) was presented by Milandr ICC JSC. This IC combines microcontroller with embedded analogue electricity metering system, DSP module and special features to fit all new government’s requirements.

Domestic RISC-V core remove foreign licensing risks. Active protective mesh grants security from probing access to transistors and bus layers. Number of the special sensors continually monitors power, clocking and light that protects against invasive attacks. Against side channel attacks hardware provides noise generators, frequency swing, random signals at active mesh and number of cryptographic coprocessors. The built-in true random number generator improves quality of randomized data (such as session keys). Special long-term key storage with guaranteed data lost at any tamping attempt should be a serious trouble for hackers. Security software is under negotiation with special service now.

Power metering in Russia will become huge and predictable market within next decade. Domestic hardware will be become available as soon as in 2021.

Yu. Kazantsev (Novosibirsk State Technical University)

The science and education centre for digital technologies in the energy sector

As in many other industries, there is now a trend towards digitisation in the energy sector, which can be seen from a number of policy documents (such as the Energynet road map of Novosibirsk Technical University, the national project for the development and deployment of digital power substations and stations, as well as the Digital Transformation 2030 policy document). A significant obstacle for the implementation of the aforementioned plans is a serious lag in the training of industry professionals from the emerging digitisation trend. As the number and complexity of smart power grid automation devices increase, so do the requirements for the scope of training programmes. The content normally taught as part of the protective relays and automatics major is no longer enough for the operation of digital substations and power stations. Meanwhile, automated control systems specialists have very little familiarity with the primary equipment of electric power facilities. This problem could be solved by introducing new major programmes at Novosibirsk State Technical University to improve the qualifications of our graduates, such as, for example, Digital Technologies in the Energy Sector. All across Russia, training centres are being set up to teach digital technologies (Moscow Power Engineering Institute, Lenenergo, TC Mekhanotronika etc). However, beyond the Urals, there still is not a single training centre of this kind. For this reason, it's been suggested that a science and education facility be set up for the free sharing of knowledge and experience in smart energy technologies as well as for the training of highly qualified technicians, taking into account the digitisation trends in the industry, with the said centre being set up in the leading regional institution of higher education, Novosibirsk State Technical University. 

P.Vorobev (Skoltech)

Optimal operating strategies for energy storage systems 

Extensive energy storage use for power systems applications is still largely limited by their high costs. Under such conditions it is essential to use optimal strategies of operating of energy storage systems that maximize their lifespan. Degradation of the electrochemical storage unit is a complex process that is dependent on the mean state of charge (SoC), depth of discharge (DoD) during each cycle, temperature etc. The analysis of experimental data on lithium-ion batteries shows, that the degradation vs. DoD is rather steep, so that it is better to cycle the battery 4 times at 20% DoD, than, say, one time at 80% DoD (the cycled energy is the same for both cases). This specific degradation behavior leads to the fact that it is often economically feasible to oversize the storage units over the minimum required capacity.
Taking the effects of degradation and battery efficiency into account we have developed strategies for optimal battery charge and discharge during grid services, such as peak shaving. The charging strategies appear to be rather complex, not corresponding to a simple constant current charge immediately after the grid service is provided. Moreover, they have to be changed during the battery lifetime to get more optimal operation. For instance, for a one peak per day case, the charging curve start very flat gradually rising towards the time of the scheduled full charge. This can be understood from the point of view of the battery life saving: degradation increases with the increase of the battery SoC, so it makes sense to keep SoC at minimum for as long as possible. Towards the end of the battery life, efficiency over a charge-discharge cycle becomes dominant, and the charging curve becomes more smooth over the whole period of time, available for charging, thus minimizing the losses.
For the two cycles per day operations, the charging strategies are simpler, but the optimal battery sizing is non-trivial — it appears to be economically feasible to significantly oversize the battery, so that by having the decreased relative DoD one extends the battery lifetime.

P.Vorobev (Skoltech)

New methods for frequency control in power systems  
Energy storage systems (ESS) are considered as an alternative to conventional generators for frequency response services. In most cases, however, this services represent a simple emulation of what the synchronous machines are doing: droop response, and "virtual inertia". The latter is being most actively studied in relation to the decrease in the power systems physical inertia due to increase in renewables penetration, and ESS are considered to be the main providers of the "inertial response service" to compensate for this. Although this approach seems to be reasonable, its advantages are questionable under the conditions of very low physical inertia in power systems.
In the present work we show, that the "virtual inertia" approach is especially ineffective, often leading to excessive control efforts during the frequency transients. Instead of the simultaneous power discharge to the grid in response to a sudden imbalance, energy storage units engage in power oscillations against each other, which is exactly caused by the virtual inertia setting. Moreover, the true emulation of the inertial behavior is not really possible by grid-following inverters — such control is a-causal. This difficulty can be overcome by using grid-forming modes of inverter control, but the control performance stays ineffective even for this case.
As an alternative to conventional approaches, we propose a new control technique — namely, frequency shaping control which allows to achieve the optimal combined response from a system with traditional generators and energy storage units. Our method allows to effectively reduce the system frequency dynamic response to a first order one, thus eliminating any oscillatory behavior, and the, so-called, frequency Nadir — a major problem in low inertia power systems. Besides improvement of the transient response, our method allows to completely rethink the frequency security assessment procedure — it can now be done by using simple algebraic calculations, rather than running numerically costly dynamic simulations. This can be especially valuable for application in microgrids, where simulation of every possible configuration/contingency can be infeasible.
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